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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to African Traditional Religion, Zimbabwe

African Traditional Religion, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
African Traditional Religion Zimbabwe 2,469,000 46.50% - - 1970 *LINK* web page: "Geographical Distribution of Followers of ATR... " (viewed 8 Nov 2001); Arranged by Chidi Denis Isizoh from the entries made in: Barret, D.B. World Christian Encylopedia. Nairobi (1982). Table: "Geographical Distribution of Adherents of African Traditional Religion in the Continent of Africa "
African Traditional Religion Zimbabwe 2,729,500 43.50% - - 1975 *LINK* web page: "Geographical Distribution of Followers of ATR... " (viewed 8 Nov 2001); Arranged by Chidi Denis Isizoh from the entries made in: Barret, D.B. World Christian Encylopedia. Nairobi (1982). Table: "Geographical Distribution of Adherents of African Traditional Religion in the Continent of Africa "
African Traditional Religion Zimbabwe - 38.00% - - 1979 *LINK* Nance Profiles web site (orig. source: OPERATION WORLD, 1979); (viewed Aug. 1998; now restricted.) Total population: 6,500,000. African Traditionals 38% - but still strong among "Christians ".
African Traditional Religion Zimbabwe 3,034,300 40.50% - - 1980 *LINK* web page: "Geographical Distribution of Followers of ATR in African Nations "; (viewed 8 Nov 2001); Arranged by Chidi Denis Isizoh from the entries made in: Barret, D.B. World Christian Encylopedia. Nairobi (1982). Table: "Geographical Distribution of Adherents of African Traditional Religion in the Continent of Africa "
African Traditional Religion Zimbabwe 3,034,300 40.50% - - 1980 *LINK* web page: "Geographical Distribution of Followers of ATR in African Nations "; (viewed 8 Nov 2001); Arranged by Chidi Denis Isizoh from the entries made in: Barret, D.B. World Christian Encylopedia. Nairobi (1982). Table: "Geographical Distribution of Adherents of African Traditional Religion in the Continent of Africa "
African Traditional Religion Zimbabwe 4,440,000 29.30% - - 2000 *LINK* web page: "Geographical Distribution of Followers of ATR in African Nations "; (viewed 8 Nov 2001); Arranged by Chidi Denis Isizoh from the entries made in: Barret, D.B. World Christian Encylopedia. Nairobi (1982). Table: "Geographical Distribution of Adherents of African Traditional Religion in the Continent of Africa "; Projection, made circa 1982.
African Traditional Religion Zimbabwe 4,440,000 29.30% - - 2000 *LINK* web page: "Geographical Distribution of Followers of ATR in African Nations "; (viewed 8 Nov 2001); Arranged by Chidi Denis Isizoh from the entries made in: Barret, D.B. World Christian Encylopedia. Nairobi (1982). Table: "Geographical Distribution of Adherents of African Traditional Religion in the Continent of Africa " [Projection.]
African Union First Colored Methodist Protestant Church USA 6,500 - 35
units
- 1988 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Section: Pietist-Methodist Family: Black Methodism; pg. 194-195. "African Union First Colored Methodist Protestant Church... Wilmington, DE [H.Q.]... Congregations are grouped into 3 districts: the Middle District, which includes New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Delaware, and Canada; the Maryland District, which includes Maryland, the District of Columbia, Virginia, and all states south and southwest of Maryland; and the Southern and Western Missionary District, which includes all the southern and western states... Membership: In 1988, the church reported 6,500 members in 35 congregations... There was no membership reported in Canada. "
African Universal Church world - - 100
units
- 1970 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.) The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); Chapter: Pentecostal Family; section: Black Trinitarian Pentecostals; pg. 271. "African Universal Church was established in 1927 in Jacksonville, Florida, by Archbishop Clarence C. Addison. The movement which became the African Universal Church was founded in the gold Coast, West Africa, by a number of tribal chiefs. Among the leaders was Laura Adanka Kauffey [who] was assassinated in 1928 in Miami... Membership: Not reported. In 1970 there were fewer than 100 congregations. "
African Zion Church USA 42,000 - - - 1866 Kennedy, Gerald. The Methodist Way of Life. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall (1958); pg. 91. "...the African Zion Church grew from 42,000 members in 1866 to 164,000 in the next two years. "
African Zion Church USA 164,000 - - - 1868 Kennedy, Gerald. The Methodist Way of Life. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall (1958); pg. 91. "...the African Zion Church grew from 42,000 members in 1866 to 164,000 in the next two years. "
Afro-American Army Pennsylvania: Philadelphia - - - - 1913 McKinley, Edward H. Marching to Glory: The History of the Salvation Army in the United States of America, 1880-1980. San Francisco: Harper & Row (1980); pg. 115. "In December 1913, Brigadier A.E. Kimball... wrote in despair to the national chief secretary, pleading for 'some way out of the present difficulty we have in connection with so many Armies.' There was the Afro-American Army in Philadelphia (an especially disreputable swindle), the Good Samaritan Army in Detroit, and Christian Army in Nashville and Louisville. "
Afro-Brazilian religions Brazil - - - - 1970 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 15). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1978. "The [religious groups] that flourish among Negroes in Haiti and Brazil bear very evident traces of their antique African origin. The Negro populations of the Brazilian coastal cities such as Recife, Bahia and Rio, maintain shrines in which the deities who are worshipped are, despite the Christianization of their names, readily identifiable as gods worshipped by their ancestors in Nigeria and Dahomey. "
Afro-Brazilian religions Brazil - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally published as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 799. "Voodoo... The religion developed largely from Dahoman sources, incorporating elements from other West African traditions, as well as elements of Catholicism... Similar religious systems can be found in other areas which had West African slave populations, particularly Brazil. "
Afro-Brazilian religions Brazil - - - - 1997 Heinrichs, Ann. Brazil ( "Enchantment of the World Second Series "). New York: Children's Press (1997); pg. 96. "Candomble is a religion that mixes African folk beliefs with Catholic symbols. It centers in Bahia state, where it originated among African slaves. Macumba and umbanda are variations found in other parts of the country. "
Afro-Brazilian religions Brazil - - - - 1998 *LINK* "AFRICAN RELIGION syncretism " (viewed 5 April 1999) "In Brasil there seems to be four distinct movements, Candomble of Bahia and the northeast, Spiritism of Rio and the more advanced urban centers; Umbanda in the urban centers not influenced by Bahia and Quimbanda a form of black magic that is practiced clandestinely everywhere. "
Afro-Brazilian religions Brazil - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 88. Chapter: "Brazilians "; "After Catholicism, Afro-Brazilian religions are the most important in Brazilian society. Umbanda, for example, is one of the most rapidly growing sects. Attracting both African and non-African Brazilians... "
Afro-Brazilian religions Brazil - - - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 14-15. Chapter: "African Brazilians "; "Location: Brazil; Population About 16 million; Religion: Afro-Brazilian sects such as Condomble; spiritualist sects "; "Afro-Brazilian sects are becoming increasingly popular with Blacks and Whites alike in Brazil. There are a variety of religious groupings that continue to follow traditional African religious practices. The first is Condomble, a religion practiced by slaves from the Yoruba tribe... Other spiritualist sects, such as Umbanda, combine African and non-African influences. " [Note: Although it is a prevalent choice among Brazilian blacks, not all can be considered adherents of Afro-Brazilian sects.]
Afro-Cuban religions Cuba - 2.00% - - 1992 Goring, Rosemary (ed). Larousse Dictionary of Beliefs & Religions (Larousse: 1994); pg. 581-584. Table: "Population Distribution of Major Beliefs "; "Figures have been compiled from the most accurate recent available information and are in most cases correct to the nearest 1% "; Listed in table as "Afro-Cuban syncretism "
Afro-Cuban religions Cuba 7,000,000 63.64% - - 1998 "The Battle for Cuba's Soul " in Newsweek (Jan. 19, 1998); pg. 42. "There are about 1 million active Protestants, and a much greater number--roughly 6 million to 7 million--who practice Afro-Cuban religions. "
Agapemonites United Kingdom: Britain - - - - 1845 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1828. "The 19th century produced the most spectacular recent claimants to messiahship in Britain. Among these were two men, one of whom 'inherited' this claim from the other. Such a transfer of a status as unique as that of messiah must be unprecedented... and yet the group known as Agapemonites, brought into being in the 1840s by an Anglican priest, Henry James Prince, accepted after his death a new immortal messiah in the person of John Hugh Smyth-Pigott. Prince had been renowned at St David's, Lampeter, where he had studied for the Anglican priesthood, as a particularly pious student... after some time his relations with the Church of England became strained, and he opened his own chapel in Brighton. With donations from his supporters, among whom were a number of wealthy women, he bought a large house and grounds at Spraxton in Somerset, and there established his community, the Adobe of Love... "
Agapemonites United Kingdom: Britain - - 2
units
- 1899 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1830. "[Prince's] own death, in 1899, might have been expected to see the collapse of the Agapemonites: instead it produced a new messianic claimant. Shortly before his death, Prince had sponsored the building of a church in Clapton, London, known as the Church of the Ark of the Covenant. This development was all the more surprising since in Prince's later years the Agapemonites had done little in the way of evangelization. It is uncertain whether the founding of this church, at which non-resident sympathizers of the Spraxton community occasionally met, had any direct connection with the choice of Prince's successor, or whether Prince had any interest in the continuance of his sect after his death. But it was at this church that, in 1902, John Hugh Smyth-Pigott declared himself the messiah. "
Agapemonites United Kingdom: England 60 - 1
unit
- 1849 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2258. "From Brighton, Prince returned to Somerse with 30,000 pounds in his pockets, most of it contributed by his society admirers. He and his followers traveled in a long procession of carriages with liveried coachmen and postilons, and at Weymouth the entourage stayed at the Royal Hotel, where Prince held a reception and announced his plans for the setting up of an Agapemone or Abode of Love... Some 200 local people of influence, invited especially for this purpose, crowded into the ballroom and agreed to give up all or part of their worldly possessions in order to be saved. With this money, a considerable sum, Prince in 1849 bought a plot of land on the outskirts of Spaxton... The estate was self-sufficient and consisted of about 200 acres. There were at first about 60 disciples in residence, with their servants. "
Agapemonites United Kingdom: England - - - - 1896 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2259. "Finally, in January 1899, when he was almost 88, Brother Prince [died]... This should be the end of the story of the Abode of Love, but it is not. In 1890 and for several years afterwards there had been a remarkable revival of interest in the Agapemone. Several prominent members of the Salvation Army joined. At Clapton, London, the Children of the Resurrection, as they now called themselves, built in 1892 a magnificent church, the Ark of the Covenant, seating about 400 people... The preacher at the opening ceremony in 1896 was the Rev. J. H. Smyth-Pigott, who was to be Brother Prince's successor at Spaxton. "
Agapemonites United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1906 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2259. "Smyth-Pigott moved down to Spaxton... In 1906 a male child was born to Miss [Ruth] Preece, the records at Somerset House showing that the father was John Hugh Smyth-Pigott... At this time there were nearly 100 women in the Abode, but few men... Smyth-Pigott died in March 1927 [at the age] of 75. It was reported that the servants were unpaid, working for love and receiving only a little pocket money. "
Agapemonites United Kingdom: England 1 - - - 1955 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2259. "In 1955 60-year-old Miss Ruth Ranken of Barnet revealed that she had been brought up as a member of the sect, and was still one in spirit... In 1962 the house of Spaxton was sold and the story of the Abode of Love ['Agapemone'] came to an end. "
Agapemonites United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1956 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 17). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 2258. "The women regarded it as an honour to be taken by [H. J. Prince], who explained in his work The Little Open Book (1856) that Christ had appointed him for these special tasks. A wave of religious fanaticism swept across the Bridgewater district. Many... intelligent people were convinced when Brother Prince rose and announced that he was the final revelation of the will of God. "
Agapemonites world - - - 2
countries
1927 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1830. "The numbers at Spraxton, sometimes reinforced by visitors from a Norwegian sister house which Smyth-Pigott frequently visited, steadily declined, and the messiah's death in 1927 reduced the numbers further. "
Agapemonites world 0 - - - 1958 Cavendish, Richard (ed.). Man, Myth & Magic: An Illustrated Encyclopedia of the Supernatural (vol. 13). New York: Marshall Cavendish Corp. (1970); pg. 1830. "...the messiah's [Smyth-Pigott's] death in 1927 reduced the numbers further. Without a leader the community slowly dwindled, until in the late 1950s Sister Ruth also died and within a short time the community disappeared. "
Aggressive Christianity Missionary Training Corps world 19 - - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "Kooks Museum " ( "Gallery of Gods " section), web page: "Aggressive Christianity Missionary Training Corps " (viewed 28 Jan. 1999). Copyright 1995, Donna Kossy. "1989... ACMTC attempted to set up new headquarters in Butte County [near] Sacramento... Free Love Ministries... finally settled in Klamath Falls, Oregon, only 3 months after they had set up in Butte County. But by then, ACMTC [Aggressive Christianity Missionary Training Corps] had dwindled to only about 19 people. "
Aggressive Christianity Missionary Training Corps world - - - 7
countries
1995 *LINK* web site: "Kooks Museum " ( "Gallery of Gods " section), web page: "Aggressive Christianity Missionary Training Corps " (viewed 28 Jan. 1999). Copyright 1995, Donna Kossy. "AGGRESSIVE CHRISTIANITY MISSIONS TRAINING CORPS... ACMTC is an updated, ferocious version of the Salvation Army, bringing Captain Jesus to demon-possessed heathen all over the globe, with missions in India, the Philippines, Nepal, Nigeria, Zimbabwe and Malawi. " [headquarters in the U.S.]
Aglipayan Church Philippines 1,890,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Aglipayan Church Philippines 2,574,000 3.90% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 3 - Asia & Oceania. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 203, 206. " Location: Philippines; Population: 66 million "; Pg. 206: "Power within the Church belonged to the monopoly of Spanish friars, so that control of the Church became a key issue for the nationalist movement in the last 19th century, ultimately resulting in the founding of the Philippine Independent Church (also called Aglipayan after Gregorio Aglipay who established it in 1902). Claiming 3.9% of the population, the Philippine Independent Church maintains essentially Catholic practices but does not recognize the Roman pope. "
Aglipayan Church Philippines: Ilocos Norte 161,351 34.95% - - 1990 *LINK* web site: "Province of Ilocos Norte Home Page " "Table 3: HOUSEHOLD POPULATION BY RELIGIOUS AFFILIATION IN ILOCOS NORTE 1990 "; "Ilocos Norte had a pop. of 461,661 in 1990 " [table lists # of households & percentage. Adherent numbers here are based on % of total pop.]
Aglipayan Church Philippines: Negros Occidental 129,012 5.30% - - 1995 *LINK* web site: "Republic of the Philippines: Province of Negros Occidental " (viewed 1998); web page: "Negros Occidental: Religious Sects "; [original sources: NSO, Bacolod] Table: "Type of Religion: Negros Occidental, 1995 "
Aglipayan Church Philippines: Pampanga: Guagua 5,593 5.86% - - 1994 *LINK* web site: Census data for municipality of Guagua in province of Pampanga in Philippines "[Total] population: 95,374 as of September 1995 Census "; Table: "From April 1994 Census of Municipality of Guagua "
Aglipayan Church Philippines: Tarlac - 12.00% - - 1998 *LINK* web site: League of Provinces Provincial Profiles "PROVINCIAL PROFILE OF TARLAC " (viewed 1998) "Because of the province's role in the formulation of the Aglipayan Church, nearly 12% of the population are members. "
Aglipayan Church world 4,500,000 - 726
units
- 1985 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 103-104. "Philippine Independent Church... Membership: As of 1985 there were a reported 4,500,000 members, 726 parishes, and 688 priests worldwide, most in the Philippines. "
Aglipayan Church world 4,500,000 - - - 1996 *LINK* Doogue, Edmund (Ecumenical News International). "German Churches Contribute Much More to WCC than Others " in Presbyterian News Service, 27 Sept. 1996 (viewed online 11 March 1999). "Those of the WCC's biggest member churches that in 1995 did not pay their membership contribution, or paid only a fraction of what they were supposed to, include... the Philippine Independent Church (4.5 million)... " [The Philippine Independent Church is more commonly known as the Aglipayan Church.]
Agni Cote d'Ivoire - - - 1
country
1995 Haskins, J. From Afar to Zulu. New York: Walker Pub. (1995); pg. 191-7. Table: Add'l African Cultures
Agnostic Africa - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Cote D'Ivoire, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zimbabwe, and Zambia, are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Alabama - 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Algeria - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Arizona - 1.10% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Arkansas - 0.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Australia 8,801 0.05% - - 1996 *LINK* Parliament of Australia web site; page: "Census 96: Religion " (viewed 18 Dec. 1999) Self-identification, from 1996 govt. census. [Listed in table as "Agnosticism "]
Agnostic Benin - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Botswana - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Burkina Faso - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Burundi - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic California - 1.20% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Cameroon - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Chad - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Colorado - 1.10% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Connecticut - 0.50% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Cote d'Ivoire - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Delaware - 0.00% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Ethiopia - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Florida - 1.00% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Gambia - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Georgia, USA - 0.30% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Ghana - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Guinea - - - - 2004 Zuckerman, Phil. "Atheism: Contemporary Rates and Patterns ", chapter in The Cambridge Companion to Atheism, ed. by Michael Martin, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge, UK (2005) "According to a 2004 survey commissioned by the BBC, Hiorth (2001) Inglehart et al (2004, 1998), Barrett et al (2001), the 1999 Gallup International Poll, and Johnstone (1993), less than 1% of those in [33 African countries listed, including this one], are atheist, agnostic, or nonreligious. "
Agnostic Idaho - 1.10% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.
Agnostic Illinois - 0.60% - - 1990 Kosmin, B. & S. Lachman. One Nation Under God: Religion in Contemporary American Society; Harmony Books: New York (1993); pg. 88-93. Table 3-1: Religious Composition of State Populations, 1990 (%). Self-identification of religious loyalty, phone survey w/ 113,000 people; by City U. of New York.


Agnostic, continued

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