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43,941 adherent statistic citations: membership and geography data for 4,300+ religions, churches, tribes, etc.

Index

back to Catholic - churchgoers, Cuba

Catholic - churchgoers, continued...

Group Where Number
of
Adherents
% of
total
pop.
Number
of
congreg./
churches/
units
Number
of
countries
Year Source Quote/
Notes
Catholic - churchgoers Cuba 150,000 1.36% - - 1998 "The Battle for Cuba's Soul " in Newsweek (Jan. 19, 1998); pg. 42. "About 4.7 million of all 11 million Cubans are baptized, but only about 150,000 attend Sunday mass. "
Catholic - churchgoers Mexico 8,820,000 - - - 1998 *LINK* DAWN Fridayfax 1998 #07: Source: Francisco Palofox, Mexico; Tessie DeVore, editor of Vida Cristiana, the Spanish edition of Charisma. Internet: www.charismamag.com, "Most of the 98 million Mexicans are culturally Roman Catholic, but only 10% go to church. " From elsewhere: 90% of pop. is Roman Catholic.
Catholic - churchgoers Poland - 80.00% - - 1977 Gascoigne, Bamber. The Christians; New York: William Morrow & Co. (1977); pg. 290. "In Poland, a Communist country, 80% of the population are church-going Roman Catholics. "
Catholic - churchgoers United Kingdom: England & Wales 1,700,000 - - - 1979 Michael P. Hornsby-Smith, Raymond M. Lee & Peter A. Reilly. "Social and Religious Change in Four English Roman Catholic Parishes " in Sociology (Vol. 18, No. 3, Aug. 1984); pg. 353. "Recent estimates indicate that there are about 1.7 million Mass attenders and five and a half million Catholics in England and Wales (Hornsby-Smith & Lee, 1979; Spencer 1966). "
Catholic - Cistercian Europe - - 530
units
- 1200 C.E. Bishop, Peter & Michael Darton (editors). The Encyclopedia of World Faiths: An Illustrated Survey of the World's Living Faiths. New York: Facts on File Publications (1987); pg. 105. "Attracting large numbers of postulants, by the year 1200 more than 530 Cistercian houses had been established across Europe. "
Catholic - Cistercian Germany - - 1
unit
- 1123 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 145. "...Cistercians soon reached a position of unrivaled influence in the Church at large. By 1120 they moved into Italy, by 1123 to Germany, by 1128 to England, by 1132 to Spain, and by 1142 to Ireland, Poland, and Hungary. "
Catholic - Cistercian Italy - - 1
unit
- 1120 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 145. "...Cistercians soon reached a position of unrivaled influence in the Church at large. By 1120 they moved into Italy, by 1123 to Germany, by 1128 to England, by 1132 to Spain, and by 1142 to Ireland, Poland, and Hungary. "
Catholic - Cistercian Spain - - 1
unit
- 1132 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 145. "...Cistercians soon reached a position of unrivaled influence in the Church at large. By 1120 they moved into Italy, by 1123 to Germany, by 1128 to England, by 1132 to Spain, and by 1142 to Ireland, Poland, and Hungary. "
Catholic - Cistercian United Kingdom: England - - 1
unit
- 1128 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 145. "...Cistercians soon reached a position of unrivaled influence in the Church at large. By 1120 they moved into Italy, by 1123 to Germany, by 1128 to England, by 1132 to Spain, and by 1142 to Ireland, Poland, and Hungary. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - 5
units
- 1115 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 225. "Under its third abbot, Stephen Harding (1109-1134), an Englishman, the significance of Citeaux rapidly grew. Four affiliated monasteries were founded by 1115, under his leadership. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - 30
units
- 1130 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 225. "Bu 1130, the Cistercian houses numbered thirty; by 1168, two hundred and eighty-eight, and a century later six hundred and seventy-one. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - 301
units
- 1153 C.E. *LINK* Pennington, M. Basil (OCSO). Web site: "The Cistercians "; web page: "The Cistercians: An Introductory History " (viewed 10 April 1999). "Before Bernard died in 1153 he had not only founded the great Abbey of Clairvaux which would become a focal point for all of Christendom but he personally sent forth men to start sixty-five other houses while his brother abbots started another 235. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - 288
units
- 1168 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 225. "Bu 1130, the Cistercian houses numbered thirty; by 1168, two hundred and eighty-eight, and a century later six hundred and seventy-one. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - 500
units
- 1200 C.E. *LINK* Pennington, M. Basil (OCSO). Web site: "The Cistercians "; web page: "The Cistercians: An Introductory History " (viewed 18 June 1999). "The [Cistercian] order continued to expand: by 1200 there were over 500 houses; on the eve of the Reformation, the records showed 742. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - 671
units
- 1268 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 225. "Bu 1130, the Cistercian houses numbered thirty; by 1168, two hundred and eighty-eight, and a century later six hundred and seventy-one. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - - - 1300 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 145. "Under the influence of such leaders, the white-and-black-robed Cistercians soon reached a position of unrivaled influence in the Church at large. By 1120 they moved into Italy, by 1123 to Germany, by 1128 to England, by 1132 to Spain, and by 1142 to Ireland, Poland, and Hungary. In time over six hundred monasteries professed allegiance to Citreaux. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - 742
units
- 1430 C.E. *LINK* Pennington, M. Basil (OCSO). Web site: "The Cistercians "; web page: "The Cistercians: An Introductory History " (viewed 18 June 1999). "The [Cistercian] order continued to expand: by 1200 there were over 500 houses; on the eve of the Reformation, the records showed 742. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 186. "Cistercians. Monks of two Roman Catholic religious orders--Cistercians of the Common Observance (Sacred Order of Cistercians: SOCist) and Cistercians of the Stricter Observance (OCSO: Trappists)--originally from reforms of Benedictine monasticism begun in 1098 at Citeaux (Cistercium) and furthered by Bernard of Clairvaux. Large numbers accepted their monastic ideal of strict poverty, ascetism, manual labor; like-minded women formed convents of Cistercian nuns. Later decline led to reform movements from the sixteenth century on, finally to division into two branches. Today the Common Observance tends to be more active, the Stricter Observance more contemplative. "
Catholic - Cistercian world - - - - 1994 *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "CISTERCIAN ORDER: founded in 1098 by Robert of Molesme as the White Monks, at Citeaux in Burgundy. It is a strict religious Order based on the RULE of SAINT BENEDICT. Historically the Cistercians played an important role in the development of agriculture especially in England. "
Catholic - clergy Canada 11,794 - - - 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 65-66. "Membership: In 1987... In Canada there were 11,375,914 members, 11794 priests, and 5,932 parishes. "
Catholic - clergy Korea, South 4,529 - 2,342
units
- 1983 *LINK* web site: "Little Korea "; web page: "Religion " (viewed 22 Jan. 1999) Table: "Status of Religions " (as of 1983); 3 columns: "churches ", "clergymen ", "followers "; presumably this is from a government survey or census.; Listed in table as "Catholicism "
Catholic - clergy Panama 300 - - - 1985 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 2 - Americas. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 356-357. "Location: Panama; Population: 2.6 million "; "More than 80% of the people are Roman Catholic... As elsewehre in Latin America, women are the mainstay of the Church. There were fewer than 300 Catholic priests in Panama the mid-1980s. "
Catholic - clergy USA 216,762 - - - 1957 Welles, Sam. The World's Great Religions, New York: Time Incorporated (1957); pg. 279. "In the U.S., Protestants have 299,586 ordained ministers and the Roman Catholics have 48,349 priests, 159,545 nuns and 8,868 lay brothers. "
Catholic - clergy USA 53,382 - - - 1987 Melton, J. Gordon (ed.). The Encyclopedia of American Religions: Vol. 1. Tarrytown, NY: Triumph Books (1991); pg. 65. "Membership: In 1987 there were 52,983,217 members, 53,382 priests, and 19,596 parishes in the United States. "
Catholic - Cluny Order Europe - - - - 910 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "CLUNIAC ORDER: an offshoot of the BENEDICTINE ORDER originating with the monastery at Cluny in Burgundy, France (founded 910) which profoundly affected the Western CHURCH in the tenth and twelfth centuries. "
Catholic - Cluny Order Europe - - - - 942 C.E. Walker, Williston. A History of the Christian Church (3rd ed., revised by Robert T. Handy; 1st ed. 1918). New York: Charles Scribner's Sons (1970); pg. 199. "Cluny was governed by a series of abbots of remarkable character and ability. Under the first and second of these, Berno (910-927) and Odo (927-942), it had many imitators, through their energetic work. Even the mother Benedictine monastery of Monte Cassino, in Italy, was reformed on Cluny lines, and, favored by Alberic, a monastery, St. Mary on the Aventine hill, was founded which represented Cluny ideas in Rome. By the death of Odo the Cluny movement was wide-spread in France and Italy. "
Catholic - Cluny Order world - - 2,000
units
- 1100 C.E. Bokenkotter, Thomas. A Concise History of the Catholic Church. Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co. (1977); pg. 144. "Until the Cluny reform there was no such thing as a monastic 'order.' Each monastery was an independent, self-governing unit immediately subject to the Pope or local bishop. But the Cluniacs introduced a new concept: The various monasteries were grouped together in a religious 'order' under the centralized authority of the abbot of Cluny, to whome they owed absolute obedience. At the same time they enjoyed complete exemption from the authority of the local bishop. The Cluny Order by the year 1100 embraced some two thousand abbeys, priories, and cells. "
Catholic - Cluny Order world - - 1,450
units
- 1100 C.E. Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 609-618. "From the tenth to the twelfth century the Abbey of Cluny exercised great reforming influence over some 1,450 abbeys and priories loosely linked to it. "
Catholic - colleges and universities USA - - 295
units
- 1965 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 140. "The number of these institutions also peaked in the 1960s, at 295, and in the early 1990s there were 243 Catholic colleges and universities in the United States. "
Catholic - colleges and universities USA - - 243
units
- 1992 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 140. "The number of these institutions also peaked in the 1960s, at 295, and in the early 1990s there were 243 Catholic colleges and universities in the United States. "
Catholic - Coptic Catholic Middle East 100,000 - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 216. "Coptic Catholic: Only existed officially since 1895. Most of the church's 100,000 members live in Cairo. "
Catholic - Coptic Catholic world 75,000 - - - 1973 Zehavi, A.M. (editor) Handbook of the World's Religions. New York: Franklin Watts (1973); pg. 12. "Since the 11th century the Patriarchal See has been in Cairo. There are about 900,000 members of the church. In the 18th century a uniate Coptic church, in communion with Rome, was established, and it has about 75,000 members. "
Catholic - Coptic Catholic world 192,955 - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "...Catholic Church... Eastern Churches, Eastern Rites, Greek Catholics, 'Uniate' Churches c. 16,700,000 combined... Alexandrian Rites: Coptic Catholic Church c.192,955; Ethiopian Catholic Church c.192,110 "
Catholic - Czech Catholic Church world - - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "...Catholic Church... Eastern Churches, Eastern Rites, Greek Catholics, 'Uniate' Churches c. 16,700,000 combined... Byzantine Rites:... Bulgarian Catholic Church c. 20,000; Czech Catholic Church ? [size unknown]... "
Catholic - Dominican world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 229. "Dominicans. Roman Catholic Religious Order of mendicant friars, officially titled Order of Friars Preachers (OP), commonly called Dominicans because founded (1216) for promoting Catholic faith by St. Dominic (Domingo do Guzman). Adapting the Rule of St. Augustine in an unusually democratic way, Dominicans have stressed contemplation, study, preaching, teaching, missions... The First Order of friars was soon joined by the Second Order of contemplative nuns. Tertiaries, Third Order members, live the Dominican spirit individually or in numerous active congregations of Dominican sisters. "
Catholic - Eastern Rite USA 530,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 221. "While most Roman Catholics belong to the Latin Rite, at least 20 groups of churches... Some 530,000 Eastern Rite Catholics, mostly Ukrainians and Ruthenians, live in the U.S. All these rites are jurisdictionally related to one or another of the Eastern Patriarchs. "
Catholic - Eastern Rite world 12,000,000 - - - 1990 Mead, Frank S. (revised by Samuel S. Hill), Handbook of Denominations in the United States (9th Ed.), Abingdon Press: Nashville, Tenn. (1990); pg. 221. "While most Roman Catholics belong to the Latin Rite, at least 20 groups of churches, with an estimated 10 to 12 million Catholics, belong to the Eastern Rite. These Catholics hold identical doctrinal beliefs and recognize the authority of the pope, but differ in language, liturgy, customs, church laws, and tradition. Generally, they follow one of 5 historic rites: Byzantine, Alexandrian, Antiochian, Armenian, or Chaldean; the main bodies are Catholic Copt, Ethiopian Catholic, Syrian, Catholic Armenian, Malabar Catholic, and Maronite. "
Catholic - Ethiopian Catholic world 192,110 - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "...Catholic Church... Eastern Churches, Eastern Rites, Greek Catholics, 'Uniate' Churches c. 16,700,000 combined... Alexandrian Rites: Coptic Catholic Church c.192,955; Ethiopian Catholic Church c.192,110 "
Catholic - evangelical USA 4,000,000 - - - 1980 Popenoe, David. Sociology (5th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall, Inc. (1983); pg. 450. "In general, evangelicals believe in the literal word of the Bible, have had a born-again experience, and are committed to spreading the messge of salvation to others. According to polls taken in 1980, over 30 million Americans qualify as evangelicals (Lipset & Raab, 1981). The evangelical movement is a growing force in many different religious denominations. Nearly 4 million Roman Catholics, for example, are evangelicals. "
Catholic - foreign language parishes USA 3,306,439 - 2,230
units
- 1916 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 128-129. Table 4.2: "Parishes Reporting Use of a Foreign Language for Services, 1916 "; "Source: Bureau of the Census (1919, vol. 1, pp. 81-82). "; Total for all langauges reported, including "misc. ": 2,230 parishes (with 3,306,439 adherents) which use only foreign langauge. Also 3,846 parishes (4,370,732 adherents) use English and the foreign languages.
Catholic - Franciscan Bosnia - - 35
units
- 1475 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 55. "Before the Turks entered Bosnia, there were thirty-five Franciscan monasteries in Bosnia proper, and four in Hercegovina. "
Catholic - Franciscan Bosnia - - 10
units
- 1585 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 55-56. "In the 1580s, a visiting Franciscan general found only ten [Franciscan monasteries] in the whole of Bosnia... "
Catholic - Franciscan Bosnia - - 10
units
- 1655 Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 55-56. "In the 1580s, a visiting Franciscan general found only ten [Franciscan monasteries] in the whole of Bosnia; the same figure (for the territory of modern Bosnia) is given by another Catholic, Bishop Maravic, in his report of 1655. The Franciscans were the only catholic clergy functioning in Bosnia... "
Catholic - Franciscan Bosnia - northeastern - - 10
units
- 1516 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 53. "in the period 1516-24... five out of the ten Franciscan monasteries [in north-eastern Bosnia] ceased to operate. "
Catholic - Franciscan Bosnia - northeastern - - 5
units
- 1524 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 53. "in the period 1516-24... five out of the ten Franciscan monasteries [in north-eastern Bosnia] ceased to operate. "
Catholic - Franciscan Herzegovina - - 4
units
- 1475 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 55. "Before the Turks entered Bosnia, there were thirty-five Franciscan monasteries in Bosnia proper, and four in Hercegovina. "
Catholic - Franciscan Herzegovina - - 4
units
- 1475 C.E. Malcom, Noel. Bosnia: A Short History. Washington Square, NY: New York University Press (1994); pg. 70. "During the century of catholic activity before the Turkish conquest, significant gains were made there by the Catholic Church, which set up four Franciscan monasteries on Hercegovinan soil... "
Catholic - Franciscan world 34,500 - - - 1945 Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 288. "Franciscans:... They are the Friars Minor, the Friars Minor Conventual, and the Friars Minor Capuchin, with some 34,500 professed members in all. With nuns of the Second Order, the Poor Clares, and the Tertiaries... "
Catholic - Franciscan world - - - - 1981 Crim, Keith (ed.). The Perennial Dictionary of World Religions. San Francisco: Harper Collins (1989). Reprint; originally pub. as Abingdon Dictionary of Living Religions, 1981; pg. 266. "Franciscans. Mendicant friars of three Roman Catholic religious orders originating from St. Francis of Assisi and his joyful gospel ideals of poverty, brotherhood, prayer, preaching and peace. The Friars Minor (OFM), Friars Minor Conventual (OFMConv), and Friars Minor Capuchin (OFMCap) divided over practice of Francis' ideals. Their ministry is mainly preaching, missions, and parish service, but also scholarship and teaching. Poor Clares are women in the Second Order of St. Francis. Laity follow Franciscan ideals individually as members of the Third Order. Some men among these united as the Third Order Regular of St. Francis (TOR); its rule is followed by many active Franciscan sisterhoods who are Third Order members. "
Catholic - French parishes USA 478,255 - 200
units
- 1916 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 128-129. Table 4.2: "Parishes Reporting Use of a Foreign Language for Services, 1916 "; "Source: Bureau of the Census (1919, vol. 1, pp. 81-82). "; 200 parishes (with 478,255 adherents) which use only foreign langauge. Also 499 parishes (548,711 adherents) use English and the foreign language.
Catholic - German parishes USA 191,347 - 206
units
- 1916 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 128-129. Table 4.2: "Parishes Reporting Use of a Foreign Language for Services, 1916 "; "Source: Bureau of the Census (1919, vol. 1, pp. 81-82). "; 206 parishes (with 191,347 adherents) which use only foreign langauge. Also 1,684 parishes (1,481,343 adherents) use English and the foreign language.
Catholic - Greek Catholic Lebanon 66,000 6.00% - - 1932 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 168. Table: "Estimated Demographic Change in Lebanon, 1932 - 1980 "; "Based on population of 1.1 million. "
Catholic - Greek Catholic Lebanon 130,000 5.00% - - 1980 Tarr, David R. & Bryan R. Daves (editors). The Middle East (6th Ed.); Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Inc. (1986); pg. 168. Table: "Estimated Demographic Change in Lebanon, 1932 - 1980 "; "Based on population of 2.6 million, not including 350,000 Palestinians. "
Catholic - Greek Catholic Lebanon 130,000 - - - 1996 1997 Britannica Book of the Year; pg. 781-783. Table: "Religion ": Divided by nations, with 2 columns: "Religious affiliation " & "1996 pop. " [of that religion]. Based on best avail. figures, whether census data, membership figures or estimates by analysts, as % of est. 1996 midyear pop.
Catholic - Greek Catholic Middle East - - - - 1992 Ovendale, Ritchie. The Longman Companion to The Middle East since 1914. London & New York: Longman (1992); pg. 217. "Greek Catholics: Initially Christians in Syria who let the Greek Orthodox Church in the 17th century. Their patriarchates of Antioch, Jerusalem and Alexandria united with the Roman Catholic Church, and recognized the supreme authority of the Pope, but they practice a Byzantine rite in Arabic. They now live mainly in Lebanon, Syria, Egypt, Israel and Jordan. "
Catholic - Greek Catholic Romania - 10.00% - - 1918 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 324, 326. "When Romania finally became one unified country in 1918, over 80% of Romanians belonged to the Romanian Orthodox Church, while 10% belonged to the Greek Catholic Church (also known as the Unite Church). The rest of the population belonged to various Roman Catholic or Protestant Churches. "
Catholic - Greek Catholic Slovakia 165,000 3.00% - - 1998 Gall, Timothy L. (ed). Worldmark Encyclopedia of Culture & Daily Life: Vol. 4 - Europe. Cleveland, OH: Eastword Publications Development (1998); pg. 355-356. "Location: Slovakia; Population: 5.5 million [population of country--86% of those are Slovaks [culturally/ethnically] "; "Besides Catholicism there are a number of other Christian faiths in Slovakia. The largest denominations are Evangelical Lutherans (6.2% of the population) and Greek Catholics (3%). "
Catholic - Greek Catholic world 2,300 - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "...Catholic Church... Eastern Churches, Eastern Rites, Greek Catholics, 'Uniate' Churches c. 16,700,000 combined... Byzantine Rites:... Krizevei Catholic Church 48,937; Greek Catholic Church 2,300... "
Catholic - Hispanic USA - 2.00% - - 1996 *LINK* Web site: Pew Research Center (1998): "The Diminishing Divide: American Churches, American Politics " "[among] registered voters... Hispanic Catholics 2%, Mormons 2%, Jews 2%, Orthodox Christians 1% and other religions 2%. "
Catholic - Hungarian Catholic Church world 280,750 - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "...Catholic Church... Eastern Churches, Eastern Rites, Greek Catholics, 'Uniate' Churches c. 16,700,000 combined... Byzantine Rites:... Hungarian Catholic Church 280,750; Italo-Albanian Catholic Church 61,597... "
Catholic - Indian language parishes USA 5,839 - 39
units
- 1916 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 128-129. Table 4.2: "Parishes Reporting Use of a Foreign Language for Services, 1916 "; "Source: Bureau of the Census (1919, vol. 1, pp. 81-82). "; 39 parishes (with 5,839 adherents) which use only foreign langauge. Also 61 parishes (20,563 adherents) use English and the foreign language.
Catholic - Italian parishes USA 420,511 - 149
units
- 1916 Finke, Roger & Rodney Stark. The Churching of America, 1776-1990. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press (1992; 3rd printing 1997); pg. 128-129. Table 4.2: "Parishes Reporting Use of a Foreign Language for Services, 1916 "; "Source: Bureau of the Census (1919, vol. 1, pp. 81-82). "; 149 parishes (with 420,511 adherents) which use only foreign langauge. Also 327 parishes (1,095,307 adherents) use English and the foreign language.
Catholic - Italo-Albanian Catholic Church world 61,597 - - - 1999 *LINK* Zuck, Jon. "Unofficial Home Page of The One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church " (last updated 21 Mar. 1999). "...Catholic Church... Eastern Churches, Eastern Rites, Greek Catholics, 'Uniate' Churches c. 16,700,000 combined... Byzantine Rites:... Hungarian Catholic Church 280,750; Italo-Albanian Catholic Church 61,597... "
Catholic - Jesuit world - - - - 1540 C.E. *LINK* Hexham, Irving. Concise Dictionary of Religion. Carol Stream, USA: InterVarsity Press (1994). (v. online 6 Oct. 1999) "JESUITS: the name given in 1540 to the SOCIETY OF JESUS a brotherhood founded six years earlier by Ignatius LOYOLA. During the period 1540-1555 it grew rapidly, acquiring an autocratic structure provided by Loyola's military training and discipline which he promoted in his Spiritual Exercises (1548). They established MISSIONS, orphanages, houses for reclaiming prostitutes, schools, centers of poor relief, and even a system of banking for destitute peasants. "
Catholic - Jesuit world 1,000 - - - 1556 C.E. Ferm, Vergilius (ed). An Encyclopedia of Religion; Westport, CT: Greenwood Press (1976; 1st ed. pub. 1945 by Philosophical Library); pg. 390. "Jesuits: A Roman Catholic religious order, founded by St. Ignatius Loyola and approved... [in] 1540. When Loyola died in 1556 the order possessed one hundred and one houses and about a thousand members. "


Catholic - Jesuit, continued

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